Kamchatka

Kamchatka Peninsula, also spelled Kamčatka, Russian Poluostrov Kamchatka, peninsula in far eastern Russia, lying between the Sea of Okhotsk on the west and the Pacific Ocean and Bering Sea on the east. A vast volcanic peninsula that is almost entirely wilderness, Kamchatka is a place of extraordinary primal beauty, rushing rivers, hot springs and snow-capped peaks.

Kamchatka is a land of volcanoes.  There are more than 300 volcanoes in Kamchatka (included into the list of UNESCO World Heritage Sites), from 28 up to 36 of them are active, or potentially active. 

Kamchatka is a home to the Valley of Geysers which is located at the junction of the rivers Shumnaya and Geysernaya. The Valley of Geysers has the second largest concentration of geysers in the world (after Icelandic geyser fields), and is the only geyser field on the Eurasia continent. Approximately 200 geysers exist in the area along with many hot-water springs and perpetual spouters. 

One way to measure the unbelievable biological wealth of this region is to count the number of plants found here. Kamchatka is home to more than 1000 species of plants – and where there are a lot of different plants, you know you’re going to find a lot of animals. Little disturbed and scarcely explored, this area is populated with brown bears, snow sheep, reindeer, wolves, foxes, wolverines and sables – not to mention half of the world’s population of massive Steller’s sea eagles. Coastal areas are home to nine species of whales, huge seabird colonies and thousands of sea otters.

Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky is the capital of the peninsula. It’s one of the oldest cities in the Far East of Russia & the most eastern city of the entire northern hemisphere. Compared to the active volcanoes and geysers, may be the peninsula’s capital is not so breathtaking place, however it does have a magnificent setting on Avacha Bay and is overlooked by two giant volcanoes and surrounded by a long line of snow-capped mountains.

Getting to Kamchatka takes time and effort, and exploring the region even more so, but few visitors leave anything other than awestruck.

Itineraries

 

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